How To Build Character’s Confidence Level

So, in recent times we started a series on Characters. We are exploring Character’s voices and how to strengthen it.

Confidence Level

Confidence level refers to the background building of your character. They are the things that encourages the speech of the character. Let’s take Clarisse from the Percy Jackson series for examples. She was able to talk rudely and confidently because she had won several battles and was assured she could win any new ordeal.

1. Background of the character:

 a character, who is from a military or cops background would definitely talk without fear. The wittiness needed to win an argument would be found in a poet, a public speaker or an actor. These things boost the way your characters reply and talk to other characters. This implies that you must understand the background of your character before you allow them give a reply to others, especially outsiders. That means, the readers would question how you allow a five-year-old boy to talk rudely to a stranger. This means that the child must either being from the ghetto or a spoilt brat or must have lived with very rude parents. 
2. Emotional Attachment:

 the emotional attachments of characters have a big role to play in the affairs of building your characters’ voices. They help you understand that characters are hinged on the words of whomever they are speaking with. A little child will confidently tell his parents about his ordeal at school than his distant aunt. So will a man tell his wife his ordeal at work than to tell a total stranger.  And as human, we get angry mostly at those we know or love.

3. Vastness of Knowledge: 

the vastness of your characters knowledge about a matter increases their knowledge of things. Funnily, these things can be seen in the works of most writers, but it would be easily controlled and used if you, as the writer, know about this. It would tamp the way you make them relate with other characters.

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