Critical thinking: Your Tool for Writing A Deeper Theme – Akinyemi Akinwunmi

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Critical thinking refers to the examination and analyzation of information with a completely open mind.
Nothing is accurate. There is always a correction here and there. That is the reason Wikipedia is always opened to corrections because information change per time.
Thinking critically exposes you to finding your own writing style. It gives you the chance to discover how you react to information.
As a writer, you don’t gulp down every information given you. You are to ask questions. Bring out a new way of seeing a theme. Many people have been writing your genre or on the theme you chose before you even decided to. Therefore, for you to present this theme in a way that will give it a new perspective, you have to critically present the truths to the world.

How to Commit to Critical Thinking
1. Write a journal of responses to things you read: to start with, absorb the statement and give a response based on what you think you’ve just heard. That will expose you to opening up a new perspective to whatever you’ve read. And the best way to do that is to open a journal.
2. Observe details: while reading, observe little things. Observe the writers’ use of transitions and the way the writer prefer to use some verbs over the others.
3. Ask questions: the next step is to use the journalistic way of handling matters. Ask the 5’w’s and h question. What is the person saying? This information will make you understand the reason behind such thought.
Why are they saying it? Have you tried to even discover why this person is so passionate about this issue? Can there be a historical event that caused his or her belief in writing such topic.
When did this person write it? It might be that at this time, the writer is doing so with the information at hand as at the time of his or her writing. And that you have a simplified, authentic version of the information.
Where was this person when writing this topic? People’s locations can be a determinant in helping you get their point of view.
Who is this person? This information will also help you to come to the realization of the way this person will write this topic.
How has the writer portrayed this topic?

4. Understand other viewpoints and consider alternative: always try to find a midpoint, a place you can always juxtapose both ideas. Now that you have the journalistic view of writing, it is up to you to break through and see the reason he or she has chosen that position. Take the case of the Chibok girls for example, anyone with the mind of the country’s security will always gun for the razing of their hideout, while someone, who is affiliated with them or one who is more of a humanitarian, will advocate that the government should find them no matter the cost.
5. Analyze and evaluate arguments: even when you’ve gone against or in support views, still go over the topics. Review them as many times as you can.
6. Never, ever generalize: ensure you’re not one of the people that yell that women are complicated or that men are simplicity or that people from American always grow up with the mentality of being great or that an African will always carry arms to fight for their right. Critical thinkers always question facts and figures.

There we have it. Can you give me a critical argument against ‘No man will see a naked woman and not want her’?

Contributor :Akinyemi Akinwunmi

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